NHAS web border

 

link to home page

link to about us

link to officers

link to events page

link to meetings

link to membership info

link to publications

links page

link to puzzle page

2016 Annual Meeting

was held on Saturday, October 29, 2016
Heritage Commons in Samuel Read Hall
Plymouth State University
Plymouth NH

ABSTRACTS:

(Original agenda is listed below abstracts)

Historical Hiking Shelters of the White Mountain National Forest. Sarah Jordan, White Mountain National Forest Heritage Program Manager.

When the White Mountain National Forest (WMNF) was established in 1918, the lands acquired by the US Forest Service included existing hiking trails and shelters constructed by outdoor clubs, several of which continue to manage and maintain shelters under permits from the USFS. In the 1920s, and especially the 1930s with the arrival of the Civilian Conservation Corps, the WMNF began to construct shelters of its own, and existing shelters were incorporated into the route of the Appalachian Trail. While the shelters have been continually relocated and reconstructed over time, many of them are now historic. In 2011, the WMNF began a holistic overview of the hiking shelter system to better understand the shelters’ history and significance, and to inform future management decisions. The project included research into the history of the hiking shelter system as a whole, as well as individual shelters, which were documented and described. The presentation will provide an overview of the project’s evolution, and the challenges of researching and documenting 41 structures in remote locations across the 800,000 acre WMNF. Historic and recent photos of the shelters will be presented to illustrate the dynamic history and development of the WMNF shelter system as it exists today.

Paleoindian Settlement and Movement Along Champlain Sea. Jess Robinson, Vermont State Archaeologist

This paper will summarize the author’s ongoing research into Paleoindian sites and site patterning along the southern arm of the Champlain Sea, a Late Pleistocene and early Holocene marine body connected to the Atlantic Ocean via the St. Lawrence River valley. Regional and larger-scale environmental changes that immediately preceded the Paleoindian entrance into the far Northeastern region include “pre-Paleoindian” glacial lake events and the drainages of impounded glacial lakes and/or the routes by which they emptied into the North Atlantic. All these have been implicated in the initiation of the Younger Dryas chronozone and precipitated environmental changes that affected subsistence and settlement patterns. Salient aspects of the Champlain Sea include salinity changes over time, radiocarbon dated marine fauna, the character of its circulation, indications of its tidal range, and the Champlain Sea/Lake Champlain transition. All these have implications for understanding the initial settlement of the Champlain Basin. The author will highlight several recently documented Paleoindian sites, some of their notable attributes, and how they may inform the larger patterning of site locations relative to the Champlain Sea and the resources therein. The vast majority of the Early and Middle Paleoindian site locations in and around the Champlain Basin correspond to one of three natural features: being adjacent to the maximum or potentially recessed margins of the Champlain Sea; being adjacent to glacially-formed lakes and ponds in general proximity to the Champlain Sea; or within probable travel corridors through the Green Mountains and Adirondacks. The author will conclude the paper with a summary of the research and briefly explore areas that may yet be answered with currently available data.

Enfield Shaker Village Excavation 2016. Brittany Faulkner, Heather Thompson and Amber Woods, Plymouth State University.

This presentation is an overview of the archaeological field work conducted at the Enfield Shaker Museum in 2016. This second season of the archeological field school, conducted in late May to early June, focused its efforts on two portions of the Church Family’s mill system: the Blacksmith Shop and the Tan House. Led by Professor David Starbuck and assisted by Hannah Dutton (as lab supervisor), students and experienced volunteers began excavation at the two sites. A great many artifacts were found, but perhaps the most intriguing ones were a trigger guard from a ca. 1740-60 French hunting or trade gun, a complete tobacco pipe bowl, a machine part from an Eclipse Corn Planter, and lots of teeth from cutting bars.

What's in the Artifact: Chemically Sourcing Nicaraguan Ceramics. Hannah Dutton, Plymouth State University

This presentation will examine the pre-contact ceramics at the site of Chiquilistagua Nicaragua to understand possible long distance trade routes of 1500 year old agrarian villages. In order to understand these ancient trade routes postulated in earlier studies, a geochemical analysis was used to isolate key minerals used in the production of the ceramic vessels.

SCRAP 2016 Summer Field School: A Brief Look at Livermore Hollow, an Early 19th Century Industrial Site along the Pemi; and Old News from Holderness. Edna Feighner, Review and Compliance Coordinator/ Historical Archaeologist, NHDHR; and Dick Boisvert, State Archaeologist, NHDHR.

The initial four weeks of the SCRAP field school were spent at the Neilsen Site in Holderness. Following up on the 2015 field school investigations expanded on ceramic rich areas and extending the investigations further away from the Squam River. Additional Middle to Late Woodland ceramics and lithics were recovered as well as Middle and Late Archaic projectile points. Two distinctive features, a stone cluster and a charcoal rich pit were also identified. Preliminary analysis of the latter indicates an Early or Middle Archaic pit possibly used for roasting. The concluding two weeks of the field school focused on the identification of archaeological remains associated with the mills and structures of Livermore Hollow. This was an area of industrial development ranging from 1769 through the early 20th century. Many foundations were partially exposed, several were identified through subsurface archaeological testing. One previously unrecorded foundation was identified under the current access road to the site. Also, materials recovered included Native American lithic chipping debris. Livermore Hollow will provide the SCRAP program with an opportunity for years of continued archaeological research for both pre and post contact period sites.


AGENDA:

Sponsored by the Social Science Department, Plymouth State University.

Registration: $10 at the door. Complimentary with a valid student ID.
Lunch is on your own.

AGENDA:

9:00 am - Registration opens. Morning refreshments.

9:50 am - Welcome and opening remarks.

10:00 - 10:30 am - Historical Hiking Shelters of the White Mountain National Forest. Sarah Jordan, White Mountain National Forest Heritage Program Manager.

10:30 - 11:00 am - Paleoindian Shore Lines and Settlement Patterns in the Champlain Basin. Jess Robinson, Vermont State Archaeologist

11:00 - 11:15 am - Break.

11:15 - 11:45 am - Enfield Shaker Village Excavation 2016. Brittany Faulkner, Heather Thompson and Amber Woods, Plymouth State University.

11:45 am - 1:00 pm - Lunch on your own.

1:00 - 1:45 pm - Business meeting and members’ forum.
Candidates for election: Linda Fuerderer for President. George Leduc for First Vice-President. Mike Malburne for Second Vice-President. Dick Boisvert for Secretary. Mark Greenly for Treasurer. David Starbuck for Editor. George McCluskey for Curator, replacing Sheila Charles. Pat Hume for a three year term as Member-at-Large of the Executive Board. Heather Tiberi for a three year term as Member-at-Large of the Executive Board, replacing Edna Feighner.

1:45 - 2:15 pm - What's in the Artifact: Chemically Sourcing Nicaraguan Ceramics. Hannah Dutton, Plymouth State University.

2:15 – 3:00 pm - SCRAP 2016 Summer Field School: A Brief Look at Livermore Hollow, an Early 19th Century Industrial Site along the Pemi; and Old News from Holderness. Edna Feighner, Review and Compliance Coordinator/ Historical Archaeologist, NHDHR; and Dick Boisvert, State Archaeologist, NHDHR.

For more information: Mark Greenly at (603) 436-6906 or greenly.mark@comcast.net. Or check the society’s website, www.nhas.org, for any updates to the program.

Download pdf of Agenda

----------

Click here for speaker list and synopsis of the 2016 Spring Meeting

Click here for speaker list and synopsis of the 2015 Annual Meeting

Click here for speaker list and synopsis of the 2015 Spring Meeting

Click here for speaker list and synopsis 2014 Annual Meeting

Click here for speaker list and synopsis of the 2014 Spring Meeting

Click here for speaker list and synopsis 2013 Annual Meeting

Click here for speaker list and synopsis of the 2013 Spring Meeting

Click here for speak list and synopsis of the 2012 Annual Meeting

Click here for speaker list and synopsis of the 2012 Spring Meeting

Click here for speaker list and minutes of the 2011 Annual Meeting